Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park


Located in Dayton, Ohio, the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park contains five separate units dedicated to three of Dayton's most notable citizens: Orville and Wilbur Wright and Paul Laurence Dunbar. Visitors can tour the Wright and Dunbar homes as well as some of the Wright brothers' former businesses. Those interested in the Wright brothers, Ohio history, or aviation history will enjoy the park and all of its historic sites.

Parking and Public Transportation at Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
For those who need to take public transportation to the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, the closest bus stop to The Wright Cycle Company Complex is located at the intersection of West Third and Williams Street. There is no public transportation available to take visitors to the Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center.

For those who drive to the park in their own car, the best places to park are at The Wright Cycle Company Complex/Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center or the Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center. Once there, visitors will be able to get directions to the other sites in the park.

Best and Worst Times to Visit Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
The best time to visit the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park is on the weekends because that is when all five park units are open. The worst time to visit the park is from November-February because several of the park units may be closed during periods of inclement weather.

Admission to Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
The majority of the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park is free to visit, but visitors do have to pay an entrance fee to visit the Paul Laurence Dunbar House or Dayton History at Carillon Park. Admission to these places ranges from $3-$8. Children five and under can visit the Paul Laurence Dunbar House for free.

Must See/Do at Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
The Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park has two interpretive centers, the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center and the Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center. These two interpretive centers are a good starting point for those who are visiting the park for the first time.

Visitors should stop and see The Wright Cycle Company, a former bicycle shop owned by the Wright brothers. The Wright Cycle Company is also the shop where the Wright brothers started researching the mechanics of flight.

Make sure to visit the Dunbar House, the former home of poet Paul Laurence Dunbar and his mother, Matilda. Dunbar spent his final years in the home before his death in 1906.

Other Places to Visit near Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
Those who want to learn more about aviation history should stop by the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, located within a 15 minute drive of the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park. The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force houses over 360 aerospace vehicles and missiles.

Another aviation-related location, the National Aviation Hall of Fame, is also located within a 15 minute drive from the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park.

Located within a 20 minute drive of the Dayton Aviation National Historical Park, The Wright "B" Flyer, Inc. is a museum where visitors can view a static model of the first production aircraft, the Wright B Flyer, and also have the chance to view pictures and artifacts relating to the Wright Brothers.

Insider Tip for Visitors to Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
There is no food available for purchase within the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, nor are there any vending machines. There is a water fountain located in the visitor's center. Those who plan to stay in the park for a while may want to bring their own water and snacks if they don't want to leave park grounds.

Author's bio: Miranda Roehler has lived in Northwest Ohio for her entire life. She studied Creative Writing and History at The University of Findlay and has been published in multiple international journals.